Flux & Solder Wire

Solder Wire

Trade Laptop Repair Solder Wire

 

 

Solder  is a fusible metal alloy used to join together metal workpieces and having a melting point below that of the workpiece(s).

electrical and electronics work solder wire is available in a range of thicknesses for hand-soldering, and with cores containing flux. It is also available as a paste or as a preformed foil shaped to match the workpiece, more suitable for mechanized mass-production. Alloys of lead and tin were universally used in the past, and are still available; they are particularly convenient for hand-soldering. Lead-free solder, somewhat less convenient for hand-soldering, is often used to avoid the environmental effect of lead.

Lead Solder Wire

Tin/lead solders, also called soft solders, are commercially available with tin concentrations between 5% and 70% by weight. The greater the tin concentration, the greater the solder’s tensile and shear strengths. Alloys commonly used for electrical soldering are 60/40 Tin/lead (Sn/Pb) which melts at 188 °C and 63/37 Sn/Pb used principally in electrical/electronic work.

The 63/37 is a eutectic alloy, which has the lowest melting point (183 °C or 361.4 °F) of all the tin/lead alloys and the melting point is truly a point — not a range.

Currently we stock due to its strength and melting point properties.

63/37 Tin-lead alloy solder,0.5mm,250g